Category Archives: Picture Post

10 From The Seaside 2 : Somewhere Under The Rainbow

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This is one of my pictures from the 1960s of the old fishing harbour at Bridlington. The Sailor’s Bethel was a non-conformist church catering for the welfare and spiritual needs of fishermen and sailors. The building is still there, but is now known by the less picturesque name of The Harbourside Evangelical Church.

10 From The Seaside 1 : Bracing Bits

Skegness Pier (1980)
Spring came yesterday. It has gone away again today, but that one oblique glance at the sun was enough to make me want to go to the seaside. So a new mini-series of scans from my old negatives starts with the seaside at its bracing best – Skegness. This photograph was taken a couple of years after the great storm of January 1978 cut the pier into three bits.

Ten From The Pub 10 : A Pint Of My Mam

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Beer Pump Display – Bobbin Ligger, Milltown Brewing Co.

 

A few years ago I suggested a name for a new beer which was being brewed by Huddersfield’s Milltown Brewing Company. The theme for their beers was the old Yorkshire textile industry and the name was based on my father’s first job in the mill – a bobbin ligger (someone who would fetch and carry empty yarn bobbins). I designed the beer pump display and incorporated a picture of my mother when she worked in the mill. This provided the unmissable experience of being able to walk into my local pub and ask for “a pint of my mam, please“.

Ten From The Pub 9 : Saloon Bar Friars

Saloon Bar

Saloon Bar Sign, Black Friar, London

 

The Black Friar in Queen Victoria Street, London is one of my favourite pubs. Back in days long gone by, I used to take groups of overseas visitors there as part of a tour of old London pubs. It is not only a fine pub, it is a work of art – tiled throughout in the style of the arts and crafts movement. Outside, there are delightful signs pointing you to the various bars. If you ever find yourself in London, visit it – you will not be disappointed.

Ten From The Pub 8 : Say Cheese

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The Cheshire Cheese, Fleet Street, London (1987)
I have just realised that I have got to number eight in this ten part series on pubs and all I have shown is buildings. Buildings in themselves – whatever their architectural merit, however much their timbers have absorbed centuries of malt and hops – are not pubs. Pubs need people – drinking, talking, laughing, enjoying life. I took this photograph in the 1980s whilst on a trip to London with a group of trade union students from Doncaster. I can still feel the glow of their friendship thirty years later.

Ten From The Pub 7 – Anchors Away

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Anchor Inn, Brighouse (c1970)

 

There has been a pub next to the Anchor Bridge over the Calder and Hebble Navigation in Brighouse ever since the canal was constructed in the 1750s. For most of that time, the pub was quite reasonably called the Anchor Inn, but for some reason it was decided that it needed a new name for the twenty-first century and it was rechristened The Bridge. The current building dates back just over one hundred years and is the third on the site : the original 1750s pub was rebuilt first of all in 1859. The Anchor has a long association with music : in the early years of the twentieth century the police tried to close it down because it was guilty of “habitually employing professional female musicians“. I remember the pub best in the 1970s when Rod Marshall was the Landlord. He was a gifted jazz musician himself and succeeded in attracting a host of local – and in some cases – international jazz musicians to play at the pub. And, if the police would care to take note, I recall that a number of them were women!

Ten From The Pub 6 : Warts From A Saddle

Halifax Gala (1965)

Saddle Hotel, Market Street / Russel Street, Halifax (1965)

 

Hidden behind the undoubted delights of the Mixenden Gala Queen on the back of a lorry, is the undoubted splendour of the Saddle Hotel. When I took this photo in 1965 it was an integral part of Halifax Borough Market, but a year later it closed down, and shortly after that it was pulled down. It was replaced by the concrete monstrosity that still sits there, like a wart on the fair face of the Borough Market.
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