Port Sunlight

We took a trip to Port Sunlight yesterday. Despite the cloudy skies and intermittent rain (the blue sky on one of my photographs is there because of wishful thinking), it was a thoroughly enjoyable day. It was interesting to compare Port Sunlight with the previous generation of model industrial villages such as Akroydon and Saltaire; … Continue reading Port Sunlight

Away 1 : Fish And Chips On The Front

AWAY 1 : There used to be home and away. Home was where you lived fifty-one weeks of the year. Away was your week at the seaside.  This, however, was quite a late shot: the give away is that the fish and chips are in polystyrene boxes. By the 1980s, away was more likely to … Continue reading Away 1 : Fish And Chips On The Front

Trunk To Trunk

A walk in the woods around Artmitage Bridge yesterday suddenly brought us to a clearing and a massive stone mill chimney, fighting for light and life in the midst of the tall trees. Its mill was lost in the valley below, and at one time an underground flue connected the two. The mill machines have … Continue reading Trunk To Trunk

Taking The Edge Of Tragedy

It seems so strange to see a Latin gravestone. Perhaps in Westminster Abbey or some don-filled university necropolis; but in the churchyard at Coley, within soot-falling distance of an old mill. And so beautifully carved; as though the beauty of the carving could somehow disguise the horror of a death too early. Moss now grows … Continue reading Taking The Edge Of Tragedy

Addressing Colour

When you add colour to an old photograph - or rather when some artificial intelligence source sat high in cyberspace adds colour to an old photograph - you tend to notice things more. This is an old photo of my mother and my grandfather which must date from either the 1930s or the 1940s - … Continue reading Addressing Colour