Derwentwater, July 1928

Scanning some old photographs from an album of my uncle's, Harry Moore, I was fairly sure this was the Lake District, and captioned it accordingly. I then found an old, faded, penciled caption written in the album which I managed to read when I scanned it with high contrast. I can therefore be even more … Continue reading Derwentwater, July 1928

Fowler’s Cards : Keighley Mechanics

The second of the cards from my Great Uncle, Fowler Beanland's postcard collection shows a view of Keighley Mechanics Institute, which is quite appropriate, as the Beanland family were rooted in Keighley and they were mechanics of one sort or another for generation after generation. The Mechanics Institute was a fine building that stood at … Continue reading Fowler’s Cards : Keighley Mechanics

Monochrome Lives In Sepia Spaces

This is a photograph of my grandmother, Harriet Ellen Burnett, outside her house in Arctic Parade, Great Horton, Bradford. I've added a touch of colour to the photo, because 100 years ago - about the time the photo was taken - people didn't lead monochrome lives or inhabit sepia spaces. My grandparents were living at … Continue reading Monochrome Lives In Sepia Spaces

A Bevy Of Beanlands

My mother, Gladys (left), her sister, Amy (right), and between them someone I can't be sure of. The chances are that it is another Beanland relative, and it might be Ada Beanland. I know I must have taken the photograph in 1969, so I need to check whether Cousin Ada was still with us at … Continue reading A Bevy Of Beanlands

Catherine And Albert

Kate and Albert Beanland (c. 1940) Scanned Family Photo (F1/3) My grandparents, Catherine and Albert Beanland, in a photograph taken a few years before my birth. According to the 1939 Register, they were living at 12, Lawrence Street, in the Princeville district of Bradford. Albert, 64 years old in 1939, was employed as a textile … Continue reading Catherine And Albert

Conversations With My Grandfather

I've always found that the march of technological innovation has been faster than anything I could reasonably predict. I remember in the very early days of computers, speculating that one day - in the distant future - it would be possible to have all the knowledge stored in the full Encyclopaedia Brittanica, available on a … Continue reading Conversations With My Grandfather

Wilson And Clara Ann Go To Totnes

There was a danger yesterday that I might have been heading in the direction of order and structure in my pointless daily jottings, so I have taken swift action today to avoid such a lamentable conclusion. The swift action comes in the form of two of my favourite people, Wilson and Clara Ann Fieldhouse. Wilson … Continue reading Wilson And Clara Ann Go To Totnes