A Decisive Moment Outside The British Museum

It was the great French photographer, Henri Cartier-Bresson, that described photography in terms of the “decisive moment”: the ability of the camera (especially of the new lightweight cameras of the 1930s and 40s) to capture a precise moment in time and demonstrate that, in one way or another, all moments are decisive. I know that I tend to complain a lot about the modern trend of the ubiquitous lens – the grafting of digital cameras onto everything from mobile phone to false teeth – but it has to be recognised that the phone-camera is a perfect vehicle for the decisive … Continue reading A Decisive Moment Outside The British Museum

No Sadder Sight Than A Derelict Pub

Can there be a sadder sight in all the world than that of a derelict pub? Fallen statues of fallen leaders I can take. Crumbling abbeys amidst pastoral settings can have a special beauty all of their own. Demolished hovels giving way to new houses can give you hope for the future. But a derelict pub – it is enough to make you turn to drink.No Saddd Continue reading No Sadder Sight Than A Derelict Pub

Lighting A Fire Under The Bath Water Of Technological History

What are you going to be getting up to this evening? I don’t know about you but I might phone up The Lad in Sheffield and see what type of weekend he has had, FaceTime my mate Denis in Spain, fire a few e-mails off to friends near and far, check-out a few of my favourite blogs from around the world, take a nice hot bath and then settle down to watch Match of the Day 2. But there again, if all the electric and battery power suddenly disappeared, I suppose I would just go to bed and feel miserable. … Continue reading Lighting A Fire Under The Bath Water Of Technological History